McCafferty - Yarn

McCafferty - Yarn

 
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Review by Shannon Shumaker

Genuine is the best way to describe McCafferty’s new album, Yarn. The band’s signature sound of in your face, punk influenced instrumentals coupled with blunt, vulnerable lyricism makes for an exciting and cathartic listen from start to finish. With songs touching on difficult personal subjects such as depression and anxiety as well as more public ones like religion and the Steubenville rape case, Yarn is ugly and intense, but arrives just when we need it the most.

Hooking you right away is Yarn’s opening track, “Loser” with a wild, in your face chorus and incredibly strong lyricism. It’s ugly and honest and really fucking blunt - the perfect start to an album that’ll not only make you want to sing along but will also hit you where it hurts. A warm, gritty song like the energetic “Yarn” sits easily alongside the dark, uncomfortable track, “Strain,” quickly proving McCafferty’s diversity for those who might be listening to them for the first time while reminding long-time fans why they still love them. Following the heavy “Strain” is “Sauerkraut,” which feels like a breath of fresh air sonically, but still packs a punch lyrically, serving as a perfect example of the band’s ability to blend personal and raw lyricism with any sound.

By the time songs like “Scotland,” “Mary Z” and “Windmill” come in, it’ll be apparent that Yarn is well worth more than one listen if for nothing more than really paying attention to the lyrical content of the album. “Scotland” his hard in lines like “What kind of God lets children die?” while “Mary Z” touches on depression and thoughts of suicide and “Windmill” tells of self-confidence issues and the struggle to accept yourself. Then, of course, there’s “Westboro Sadness,” which is easily the most aggressive song on the album, and with good reason: it touches on high-profile rape cases and their tendency to get swept under the rug.

From beginning to end, Yarn is filled with standout after standout track. Each song on the album not only has a purpose, but hits hard for a different reason, be it the powerful lyrical content or the band’s ability to write songs that would sit perfectly alongside early emo artists or even current bands like The Front Bottoms or Sorority Noise. Like a horror movie, Yarn is designed to make you feel uncomfortable. These songs aren’t pretty by any means, but they’re incredibly vulnerable, honest and transparent. Accompanied by gritty guitar work and emotional vocals, Yarn has everything it takes to make a timeless, standout release.

LISTEN TO: "Windmill" or "Westboro Sadness"

STAY CONNECTED WITH MCCAFFERTY: https://www.facebook.com/mccaffertyband/

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